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horroroftruant:

Ten Behind-the-Scenes Photos From Classic Horror Movies

(via 365daysofhalloween)

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Anonymous said: I noticed you're a big horror fan. How many horror films do you think you've seen? 100s or 1000? Also what's your fav sub genre ?

i’ve definitely seen hundreds of horror films, i don’t know if it’s close to 1000 but it feels like it. i’m a big fan of slashers, my favorite movie ever is friday the 13th IV but i’ll watch jason voorhees kill people in almost anything (the exclusion being jason x)

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funkies:

kristenforthewin:

Kristen in NYC today (08/10/2014)

Y
A
S

(via hasmeenah)

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highfemmequeen:

house-of-thought:

Viking Magic Wand
For decades the experts at the British Museum believed that this item, discovered at a woman’s grave from Norway was just a hook used in fishing. However, new research suggests that it was her ‘magic wand’ and that it was deliberately bent to destroy its power.The Times newspaper reported that this item, a 90 cm long iron rod, was first brought to the British Museum in 1894. British Museum curator Sue Branning believes that it was probably a magical staff used to perform ‘seithr’, a form of Viking sorcery predominantly practiced by women.She told The Times: ”These are magical practices, which we don’t fully understand. It involves divination, prophecy, communication with the dead and making people do things. Our rod fits, in terms of its form, with a number of these rods that turn up in the 9th and 10th century in female burials. They normally take the form of these long iron rods with knobs attached to them.”The rod would have been ‘ritually’ destroyed in order to prevent the sorceress from rising from the dead, or to stop anyone else from using it. Branning adds, ”When we hear about the Vikings we hear all about the powerful warriors, but now we know there were also powerful women. These women were very well respected, but they were quite feared as well. They may have been on the margins of society. You might not want to get close to them because they have this power. The sources we have describe them as wearing blue and black cloaks with gems attached.”
Source

nogodsonequeen

highfemmequeen:

house-of-thought:

Viking Magic Wand

For decades the experts at the British Museum believed that this item, discovered at a woman’s grave from Norway was just a hook used in fishing. However, new research suggests that it was her ‘magic wand’ and that it was deliberately bent to destroy its power.

The Times newspaper reported that this item, a 90 cm long iron rod, was first brought to the British Museum in 1894. British Museum curator Sue Branning believes that it was probably a magical staff used to perform ‘seithr’, a form of Viking sorcery predominantly practiced by women.

She told The Times: ”These are magical practices, which we don’t fully understand. It involves divination, prophecy, communication with the dead and making people do things. Our rod fits, in terms of its form, with a number of these rods that turn up in the 9th and 10th century in female burials. They normally take the form of these long iron rods with knobs attached to them.”

The rod would have been ‘ritually’ destroyed in order to prevent the sorceress from rising from the dead, or to stop anyone else from using it. Branning adds, ”When we hear about the Vikings we hear all about the powerful warriors, but now we know there were also powerful women. These women were very well respected, but they were quite feared as well. They may have been on the margins of society. You might not want to get close to them because they have this power. The sources we have describe them as wearing blue and black cloaks with gems attached.”

Source

nogodsonequeen

(via h---a---l---c---y---o---n)

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stop flexing your manly boob muscles or whatever.

(Source: cordichase, via angelinvestigations)

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It’s almost 1 in the afternoon I think I’m still drunk help me

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4ever pissed

4ever pissed

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Not even puppy snuggles and candy in bed can remedy this bad mood

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scripted-lies-and-broken-ties said: Ok so I have a question, if this is stupid then tell me or just ignore the question, but if for Halloween someone paints their face like a skull is that still offensive or is it just during dis de Los muertos also is using dia de Los muertos to honor the dead appropriation if someone is not of that heritage

kristineirl:

there is no reason to paint your face like a sugar skull for halloween because culture is not a costume. dia de los muertos is not halloween.

there is a big difference between skulls and sugar skulls

this is a-ok!

v pretty!

this is 100% not

v racist

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givenmonday:

WALK TH ROUGH THE SNOW TO A BAR WHERE THERES N O ONE I KNOW DRINK SLOW DRINK SLOW WITH NOW HERE TO GO AND WHEN I LEAVE I’LL BE SINGING THIS SONG THE SUMMERS GONE CARRY ON I’M A GHOST IN THE D AWN

(via takelotswithalcohol)

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alwaysimagining:

I love how despite everything, she still remembers to do this every single year lol.

alwaysimagining:

I love how despite everything, she still remembers to do this every single year lol.

(Source: everythinglindsaylohan, via moonlapsed)

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lesliecrusher:

blanket apology to all the female celebrities i hated as a teenager because i was up to my eyeballs in internalized misogyny

(via zombiegrinder)

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animedads:

HP Lovecraft had this notebook that he kept all his story ideas in and it was published a while ago or something and most of the notes are racist in some capacity but one of them is just like “213. Vampire dog.”

(via hasmeenah)